Knocked Up

While watching the movie I would have to a say that a high-key lighting design was the main use  in the film. This design has very bright light over everything, with few shadows and relatively low contrast between the lightest and darkest parts of the scene. This style of lighting is typical of comedies, happy scenes, institutional and office scenes. The opening scene of the movie everyone is outside in the pool on a bright and sunny California day.  Which with this type of light produced by the sun you might automatically be drawn to high-key lighting. Also, in most shots taken inside the homes, there is a very bright and luminous look to the scene. In the perspective of the movie, the high-key lighting tends to be cheerful, expansive, and energetic, which is why it’s often used for comedy , and brings the mood of the entire movie to the level of the humor.

A constant theme throughout the movie is family, and this type of lighting technique contributes to the overall family theme. With the lighting style representing cheerfulness and energy, it all comes together as probably the best lighting choice for the movie.

For the overall tone of the film, the outside daylight really makes you feel like you are missing out. With almost all of the lighting throughout the movie having this sunshine type light, it makes you want to be there and almost envy the cast for being in such nice and pleasant scenery.  It doesn’t overpower the cast in anyway or make the movie seem too serious.

In some parts of the movie there were serious scenes that where appropriately shot with the correct type of lighting for the mood being set. If for any reason there was a decision made to shoot the entire film in another way, it would have really drained from the overall concept of the movie. If the entire movie was shot in say three-point lighting, there would have been a vibe from what was being seen and being heard.

Resources

Jim Stinson, In The Mood, March 2006, Retrieved from www.videomaker.com/article/10780-in-the-mood

Goodykoontz, B., & Jacobs, C. P. (2014). Film:From Watching To seeing (2nd ed.). San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc.

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